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Lesson #1 - Letters, Punctuation, & Pronunciation
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Learn about Vowels, Consonants, Marking, Pronunciation Rules, and Punctuation
This public article was written by Zfeinst, and last updated on 2 Nov 2020, 04:22.

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11. Proverbs
Menu 1. Vowels/Marked Vowels 2. Marked Consonants 3. Normal Consonants 4. Other Pronunciation Rules 5. Pronunciation of Compounded Words 6. Punctuation 7. Your Turn For the next lesson, click here!
Table of Contents



¡salwe end banvedó!

(Hello and Welcome!)


This is Lesson 1 in Tarese’asen (Taresian)!

In this lesson, you will learn the letters of Tarese’asen, and their pronunciations.

Since the alphabet of Tarese’asen is different than Latin or Cyrillic alphabets, it’s best to start by learning the letters and how they sound.

What’s cool about Tarese’asen is that there’s only one case of letters (no upper/lower case), so that means there’s half as many letters to know than there would otherwise be. What’s also nice about Tarese’asen is that pronunciation rules are kept simple and uniform throughout the entire language. Once you know these rules, you won’t be surprised by a word with a pronunciation different than how it’s spelled - a problem commonly found in English.

[top]Vowels/Marked Vowels


Tarese’asen, like English, has five vowels - a,e,i,o, and u. However, each vowel makes a different sound, depending on whether or not they are “marked” (with an apostrophe). The pronunciation of each vowel, both marked and unmarked, are shown in the table below.

VowelIPAEnglish Comparison
a athe “a” in “alphabet”
á ɔ:the “a” in “law”
e ɛthe “e” in “bet”
é ithe “ee” in “bee
i ɪthe “i” in “lid”
í the “i” in “light”
o ɑthe “o” in “log”
ó əʊthe “o” in “boat”
u ʌthe “u” in “shut”
ú uthe “oo” in “boot”


[top]Marked Consonants


There are also some consonants, or combination of consonants that, when marked, produce different sounds. These consonants, and their marked variants, are shown in the table below.

ConsonantIPANatLang Comparison
c t͡ʃthe “ch” in “chair”
h hthe “h” in “hat”
ch’ k / kʰ* the “k” in “king”
r ɾ / ɹ* the “r” in the Spanish word “pero”, meaning “but” / the “r” in the word “oar
rr’ rthe “rr” in the Spanish word “perro”, meaning “dog”
x the “cti” in “action”
x’ xthe “ch” in the German word “Buch”, meaning “book”


* See ‘Other Pronunciation Rules’

[top]Normal Consonants


All other consonants can never be marked, and as such, only have one pronunciation.

ConsonantIPAEnglish Comparison
b bthe “b” in “book”
d dthe “d” in “dog”
f fthe “f” in “friend”
g gthe “g” in “gun”
j d͡ʒthe “j” in “jump”
l lthe “l” in “learn”
m mthe “m” in “mother”
n nthe “n” in “night”
p pthe “p” in “peace”
s sthe “s” in “smile”
t tthe “t” in “teach”
þ þthe “th” in “thing”
v vthe “v” in “velvet”
w wthe “w” in “win”
y jthe “y” in “yes”
z zthe “z” in “zebra”
- ʔthe “-” in “uh-oh”


[top]Other Pronunciation Rules


There are, in some rare (but important) cases, where the position/combination of letter(s) within a word can change the pronunciation of the letter(s).

CONSONANTS

If the letters ng found at the end of the word, they are pronounced as “ŋ”

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If r (normally pronounced “ɾ”), is found at the end of the word, or after vowels (except when followed by another vowel), it is pronounced as “ɹ”.

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If ch’ (normally pronounced “k”) is found before a vowel, it becomes aspirated (“kʰ”)

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VOWELS

If e (normally pronounced “ɛ”), is found at the end of the word, it is pronounced as “eɪ”

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If ey is found at the end of the word, it is pronounced as “eɪjɪ”.

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If there are the letters ae found anywhere in the word, they are also pronounced as “eɪ”.

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If the letters éa are found at the end of the word, it is pronounced as “iə”.

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If there are the letters found anywhere in the word, they are pronounced as the polyphthong “au”.

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In Tarese’asen, it is impossible, except for the cases stated above, for two vowels to be put next to each other. Instead, they are separated by - (“ʔ”).

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[top]Pronunciation of Compounded Words


Many words in Tarese’asen are compound words - words formed by combining two smaller words. In these words, the pronunciation of the original words are kept, rather than changed to be as if the compound word was a single word.

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[top]Punctuation


Tarese’asen also has different marks for punctuation than typical Latin symbols. These are shown in the table below.

PunctuationEnglish EquivalentEnglish Meaning
, ,Comma
. .Period
¿_? ¿_?Question Mark
¡_! ¡_!Exclamation Mark
“_” “_”Quotation Marks
/ /Slash
: :Colon


[top]Your Turn


How is the word aram (Bird) pronounced?
 

How is the letter é pronounced?
 

How is the word aple (Apple) pronounced?
 

True or False: The word ch’ux (to cook) is pronounced “ t͡ʃhʊx”
 

What does the word caen mean?
 


If you’re ready to move onto the next lesson, click here!
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