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Lesson #6 - Verbs Pt. 1
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Learn the Tenses and Affixes of Verbs
This public article was written by Zfeinst, and last updated on 3 Nov 2020, 12:25.

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11. Proverbs
Menu 1. Past, Present, and Future: Taresian Tenses 2. The Simple Tense 3. Perfect Tense 4. Progressive Tense 5. Perfect Progressive Tense 6. Summary
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Table of Contents



¡salwe!


¡banvedó a da K-on tacen en tareséasen!

(Welcome to the 6th Lesson in Taresian!)


The next three lessons are going to be devoted to verbs, since there’s a lot to cover about them This lesson is going to be all about the tenses of verbs.


[top]Past, Present, and Future: Taresian Tenses


In English, there are three tenses, the past, present, and future tenses. tareséasen is different in that it divides the past and future tenses in two. The past tense is divided into the distant past, and the recent past.

The recent past is used for events/actions that take place anywhere from seconds ago up until one day before the present, while the distant past is used for events/actions that take place any time before then.

Meanwhile the future tense is divided into the near future, and the distant future. The distinction for when one or the other is used is the same as the past tenses, except for points in the time in the future.

[top]The Simple Tense


The simple tense, like most languages, is used when talking about facts or habitual activities.

Distant Past and Recent Past Tenses

When using the Simple Tense, both past tenses make use of the past tense suffix -ed or -d.

-d is used after verbs ending in vowels...

Examples:
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...while -ed is used after verbs ending in consonants.

Example:
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However, to specify that you’re speaking in the Recent Past tense, you must add the word jus before the noun that is before the verb in question.

Examples:
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If a pronoun is involved in the sentence, jus is added as a modifier suffix to the pronoun.

Examples:
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Present Tense

The Present Simple Tense is rather simple. Simply leave the verb in the infinitive, no matter what pronoun or noun comes before it.

Examples:
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Near and Far Future Tenses

The two future tenses, unlike the past tenses, do not utilize a verbal suffix. Rather, for the Near Future tense, the word guna is placed before the verb (or as a suffix for a pronoun).

Examples:
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The same goes for the Far Future, which instead uses the word wal.
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[top]Perfect Tense


The perfect tense is used when describing actions that has already been completed. All verbs in the perfect tense, no matter at what time period, all end with -pé.

Distant and Recent Past

In addition to ending with -pé, the same rules that apply to the Distant Past Simple and Recent Past Simple tenses also apply to the Distant Past Perfect and Recent Past Perfect.

Distant Past Examples:
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Recent Past Examples:
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Present

As with the simple present tense, except for the -pé suffix, the verb remains in the infinitive.

Examples:
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Near and Far Future

In addition to ending with -pé, the same rules that apply to the Immediate Future Simple and Distant Future Simple tenses also apply to the Immediate Future Perfect and Distant Future Perfect.

Immediate Future Examples:
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Distant Future Examples:
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[top]Progressive Tense


The progressive tense is used to describe ongoing actions. For all tenses, the progressive tense is marked by the suffix -andó (or simply -ndó if the verb ends in a vowel).

Distant and Recent Past Tenses

To denote the Distant Past tense, in addition to the -andó suffix, the word vas is placed before the verb, except if the subject is a pronoun, in which vas is attached to the pronoun as a suffix.

Examples:
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To denote the Recent Past Tense, the same rules apply, except jus is added to vas (vasjus).

Examples:
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Present Tense

As with the perfect tense, the present progressive tense is only marked by the presence of the -andó suffix

Examples:
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Near and Far Future Tenses

To denote the Near Future Tense, in addition to the -andó suffix, the word gunabe is placed before the verb, except if the subject is a pronoun, in which vas is attached to the pronoun as a suffix.

Examples:
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To denote the Far Future Tense, the same rules apply, except with the word wabe.

Examples:
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[top]Perfect Progressive Tense


The perfect progressive tense is used to describe a continuous action that was started in the past, and finished at some point in the past.

[top]Summary

Below is a summary of all tareséasen verb tenses, using the word órr’ (to hear), using the first person.




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