cws
Greetings Guest
home > library > journal > view_article
« Back to Articles ✎ Edit Article ✖ Delete Article » Journal
Non-Productive Word Derivation
0▲ 0 ▼ 0
A brief description of archaic derivational suffixes in Himmaswa..
This private article was written by [Deactivated User], and last updated on 20 Jun 2018, 02:45.

[comments]
[Public] ? ?
?FYI...
This article is a work in progress! Check back later in case any changes have occurred.

Though Himmaswa is a relatively analytic language, there are nevertheless numerous dependent morphemes. This article will describe the function of two sets of derivational morphemes.

The first set of suffixes are entirely non-productive, and are a relic from an older form of the language. They typically cause significant alteration in the word to which they attach. They also occasionally change form themselves, creating often opaque compounds. Consequently, they do not have dedicated characters in the native script; instead, each compound is treated by the script as an independent word and is written with a unique character.

The suffixes discussed in this article are
-er
-en
-oung
-ol
-oy

The most apparent characteristic of these affixes is the way in which they alter the form of the word to which they attach, as the resulting compound is prototypically monosyllabic or sesquisyllabic. The alteration occurs as follows:

Words of the pattern CVC are usually reduced to CC-, e.g.:
peak "go out" → pker "contend with".
Occasionally, this irregularly does not occur; long vowels may instead simply be reduced to one of the seven basic vowels: /ɪ ʊ ɛ œ ʌ ɔ a/ in order to form a sesquisyllable, e.g.:

suat "fabric" → soten "blanket"
jiap "to plough" → jepen "plough (tool)"

Words of the pattern CCVC are reduced to CVC-, dropping the second consonant of the initial cluster, e.g.:
drot "spine" → doten "key"

The initial vowel in a sesquisyllable can only be one of the seven basic vowels: /ɪ ʊ ɛ œ ʌ ɔ a/, meaning long vowels in the initial word must be reduced appropriately, e.g.:

✎ Edit Article ✖ Delete Article
Comments
privacy | FAQs | rules | statistics | graphs | donate | api (indev)
Viewing CWS in: English | Time now is 15-Jun-24 03:47 | Δt: 331.5151ms