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How time is expressed in Teedish.
This public article was written by Knabo Croc, and last updated on 24 Aug 2018, 22:41. Editing of this article is shared with Conlanger.

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In natural languages, there are several prepositions to express time, or more specifically, that an event is happening during a given time. In English, for example, we use at, on, in, during, etc. and it is often troublesome to choose the most appropriate one. Consider the following phrases:

- in January
- on January 23
- at 02:30 pm
- during the party

In Teedish, a single preposition, vent, is used in all those cases. We say:

- vent Enmonde
- vent 23 Enmonde
- vent 02:30 den / 14:30
- vent de bace

The preposition vent can be additionally used when one is referring to a year, a century, a millenium, any event and any period of time. However, it is not a substitute for every existing time preposition; words with more specific senses such as yet have their own translations.

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Another time convention of Teedish: dates are written according to the following pattern:

- 23 Enmonde 2017

That can be transcripted numerically with any signs, as long as it follows the order. Examples:

- 23/01/2017
- 23.01.2017
- 23|01|2017

Incomplete dates, such as when the day or year is missing, also follow the pattern in that the shorterst time unit must always precede the longest one. Examples:

- Enmonde 2017
- 01/2017
- 01.2017
- 01|2017

- 23 Enmonde
- 23/01
- 23.01
- 23|01

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To express hours and minutes, one can use either a 24-hour system or a 12-hour system. In the latter case, Teedish equivalents for am and pm are, respectively, ned and den. Examples:

- 14:30 / 02:30 den
- 02:30 / 02:30 ned



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on 24/08/18 22:41+8Knabo CrocFixes
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