cws
Greetings Guest
home > library > journal > view_article
« Back to Articles » Journal
Soclesian
0▲ 0 ▼ 0
The basics of the beautiful language known as Soclesian
This public article was written by [Deactivated User], and last updated on 15 Feb 2017, 07:09.

[comments] Menu 1. Join the Revolution! 2. A quick summary 3. Phonology/Orthography - overview 4. Phonology - sound changes 5. Phonology - vowels 6. Grammar - nouns 7. Grammar - animacy/definite articles 8. Grammar - cases 9. Grammar - verbs
[top]Join the Revolution!

Soclesian (Ą Sokotlą̂ząk from sokot "popular, of the people" [adj] + lą̂ząk "language" [n] itself from lą̂zą "tongue" [n]) is a language that combines the beautifully harsh sounds, consonant clusters and awkward 'noises' sometimes found in languages such as Hungarian and Russian and combines them with more elegant and rhythmic elements found in languages such as Finnish. The result is a highly complex, agglutinating melting pot of grammar and meaning that delivers a highly precise and defined communication system. With more than 40 grammatical cases and more than 100 unique sounds (and individual letters to represent each), the Soclesian language is one that in its sheer ugliness, is an incredibly satisfyingly angry language that instills calm and collected thought, while inspiring uprising, revolution, and the everlasting fight for freedom!

Learn the language of the Black and Red, and transcend into Enlightenment!

[top]A quick summary

Soclesian has:
* More than 40 grammatical cases
* Three grammatical genders
* 4 plurals
* 4 persons
* 5 types of animacy
* A total of approximately 34 individual noun types, which can be classified into 7 main groups
* 3 types of verb conjugations (transitive, intransitive, indefinite)
* A SOV pattern though word order is relatively free
* Very extensive phonological inventory
and
* All vowels have iotised and palatised variants, each with its own letter
* Almost all consonants have palatised variants, each with its own letter
* Definiteness is marked by 10 different articles, while indefiniteness is unmarked

[top]Phonology/Orthography - overview

Soclesian has a vast array of sounds, each of which having its own distinct letter. The alphabet, shown below, comrpises of letters and symbols derived and based from/on the Latin, Cyrillic, Greek, Armenian scripts and various extensions thereof and includes many diacritical marks. The phonetic values of these letters can be seen on the language summary page.

a â я я̂ b ƀ e é э є f ƒ h ħ x ẋ ç č i í ӥ ѝ j g г ğ k ǩ ξ q l л λ m ɯ n ɲ o ô ë ê r ȑ ř ŕ s ш ƨ t ť c ц ɔ u û ю ю̂ v ṽ y ÿ ψ ύ z ж ʒ d ď δ ъ д ą ā w ŵ ð þ չ ջ и ӣ ч ҹ ә ӛ æ ǣ ө ӫ ы ӹ p ṕ й


[top]Phonology - sound changes

Soclesian is subject to vowel harmony (back vs front/neutral) and consonant gradation which can prove to be quite troublesome for learners of the language, especially considering the high level of agglutination. The rules, however, are absolute and highly regular and can be applied language-wide without exception.

[top]Phonology - vowels

Below is a table illustrating the 10 base Soclesian vowels and their various other forms. B = base, S = short, L = Long, I = Iotised.

Back vowels

Base
short
Base
long
Iotised
short
Iotised
long
a
/a/
â
/a:/
я
/ja/
я̂
/ja:/
o
/o/
ô
/o:/
ë
/jo/
ê
/jo:/
u
/u/
û
/u:/
ю
/ju/
ю̂
/ju:/
ą
/ɑ/
ā
/ɑ:/
w
/jɑ/
ŵ
/jɑ:/

Neutral vowels

Base
short
Base
long
Iotised
short
Iotised
long
e
/ɛ/
é
/ɛ:/
э
/jɛ/
є
/jɛ:/
i
/i/
í
/i:/
ӥ
/ji/
ѝ
/ji:/
չ
/ɪ̈/
ջ
/ɪ̈:/
и
/jɪ̈/
ӣ
/jɪ̈:/

Front vowels

Base
short
Base
long
Iotised
short
Iotised
long
ә
/æ/
ӛ
/æ:/
æ
/jæ/
ǣ
/jæ:/
ө
/œ/
ӫ
/œ:/
ы
/jœ/
ӹ
/jœ:/
y
/y/
ÿ
/y:/
ψ
/jy/
ύ
/jy:/


[top]Grammar - nouns

Nouns in Soclesian are divided into three grammatical genders: masculine, feminine and neuter which can be identified by the noun endings and masculine and feminine nouns can be further divided into declensions based on their stem (given to the right).

Masculine:
  1. U declension: -u/-y, -us/-ys, -ol/өl, -li
    • qélu qélu (butter)
    • akelus akelu- (building)
    • hâlol1. hâlolu-, 2. hâlolce- (port)
    • zaili zailiu- (line)


  2. O declension: -os/-өs, -λt, -nt, -k, -o/-ө, most consonants
    • kaunos kaunô- (boy)
    • izoλt izoλto- (horse)
    • ƀӫrөnt ƀӫrөndө- (brother)
    • lāząk lāząko- (language)
    • kovo kovo- (sand)


  3. E/U declension: -ô, -tus/-tys, -in
    • ovô 1. ove-, 2. ovu- (piece)
    • optus 1. optuξe-, 2. optuξu- (ash)
    • kolondiin 1. kolondime-, 2. kolondimu- (atmosphere)


Feminine
  1. A declension: -a/-ә, -as/-әs, -ton/-tөn, -alom/-elem/-әlөm, -rz
    • marta martaя- (cat)
    • taidas taitą̂- (factory)
    • oleton olettoma- (technology)
    • koȑalom koȑalma- (apricot)
    • ƀөrz ƀөrzә- (death)


  2. I declension: -nti, -ns/-nz, -lvi
    • maguntimagundi- (female cook)
    • maronsmaronsi- (floor)
    • ilviilvi- (mouse)


  3. E/I declension: -ӛ, -ӫ, -ÿ
    • ğӫ 1. ğөve-, 2. ğөvi- (donkey)
    • ξӛ 1. ξәve-, 2. ξәvi- (break[age])
    • шÿ 1.шyve-, 2. шyvi- (sourness)




Neuter
There are 13 types of neuter nouns, the endings of most of which involve the vowels e or i. Unlike the masculine and feminine nouns, these nouns are not divided into declensions.
-en, -nen, -is, -es, -e, -t, -aus/-әys, -si, -em, -psi/-i, -g/-m, -l
  • tormen 1.tormi-, 2. tormen-, 3. torme- (beetle)
  • iminen1.imise-, 2. imisi- (tribe)
  • klestis1.kleste-, 2. klesti- (pomegranate)
  • terhes1.terhe-, 2. terhi-(tree)
  • terhe1.terhé-, 2. terhĕ- (space)
  • ceveryt1.ceverye-, 2. ceverψ̆- (snake)
  • raskaus1.raskaude-, 2. raskaudi- (health)
  • korosi1.korode-, 2. korodi- (bird)
  • kelem1.kelme-, 2. kelmi- (night)
  • bapsi1.bapse-, 2. bapsi- (puppy)
  • mintөg 1.mintөge-, 2. mintөgi-(bank)
  • askel1.askele-, 2. akeli-, 3. askeл- (mind)


[top]Grammar - animacy/definite articles

In addition to gender, Soclesian exhibits six forms of fucntioning animacy and five forms of non-functioning animacy which determine the definite article used with nouns.

There are four main groups: living animate, functioning inanimate and deceased animate, non-functioning inanimate.

Animate
1: Animals (in accordance with the definition a living organism which feeds on organic matter, typically having specialized sense organs and nervous system and able to respond rapidly to stimuli). Such nouns make use of the article ą which becomes ąz when the noun begins on a vowel:
ą fímu (the dog), ąz arag (the father)

2: Non-animals. Ie: everything belonging to the the taxonomic kingdoms Plantae, Fungi, Prokaryota, Protozoa and Chromista. These nouns make use of the article which becomes het when the noun begins on a vowel:
terhes (the tree), het okru (the plant)

Inanimate
1: Diseases and illness: all names of diseases, illnesses, sickness or anything else that causes negative health effects. Note that this does not include the pathogens that cause the disease, but rather only the name of the disease itself. For example, bacteria cause tuberculosis, however bacteria are prokaryotes, and the Soclesian word is thus considered an animate noun, thus plus (the bacterium), ʒet ƀөrәstәys (the tuberculosis)

2: Natural inanimate nouns: non-human, non-living (in any sense), insentient natural objects such as rivers, mountains, rocks etc. These nouns make use of the article o which becomes op when the noun begins on a vowel:
o mrûmos (the river), op ӛg (the mud)

3: Unnatural inanimate nouns: human-made physical objects including all kinds of buildings, technology etc. These nouns make use of the article u which becomes ut when the noun begins on a vowel:
u ħûvraus (the house), ut akelus (the building)

4: Abstract objects: nouns denoting an idea, quality, state, force, emotion or phenomenon rather than a concrete object including grammatical, scientific and medical terminology etc. These nouns make use of the article i which becomes en when the noun begins on a vowel:
i raskaus (the health), en eragus (the brilliance)

[top]Grammar - cases

Soclesian is known for its staggering number of cases (62 in total) which are one of the reasons that the language is famed for being as precise as it is. The cases can be divided into three major groups

1: Transitive.
This group is comprised of only four cases: accusative, dative, comitative and instrumental. These cases are used with the transitive verb conjugation and require high levels of pronominal, verbal and nominal concord.

2: Supporting.
This group is the second largest group and contains 10 cases. These cases are used to express benefit, fear, possession, state and time.

3: Locative.
The Soclesian locative system is very extensive as it expresses some 48 cases. Each case has four forms, each indicating a different type of movement: movement toward, movement away from, no movement and movement through. The cases are 100% regular and exhibit no exceptions in their formations. The table below explains the cases by means of an approximate English translation and includes the adverbial form of the location mentioned. These adverbs are used when there is no object of the movement/non-movement conducted by the subject in the sentence.
AdverbTowardStaticAwayVia
Internal bąnessentintoinsideout of through
Near lontto nearnearfrom nearpassing near
External hązellenttowardatfrompassing by
Pertingent ɔąnentto touchingtouchingfrom touchingtouching while passing
Intrative cessentOpenOpenClosedClosed
Above ûhentOpenOpenClosedClosed
Below âlentOpenOpenClosedClosed
Adjacent өrzөntOpenOpenClosedClosed
In front of әʒөntOpenOpenClosedClosed
Behind élerentOpenOpenClosedClosed
On the right ílөtOpenOpenClosedClosed
On the left ilafOpenOpenClosedClosed


[top]Grammar - verbs

Verbs can be used in three different conjugations: transitive, intransitive and indefinite. The use of each of these is dependent on other elements such as mood, aspect, presence or absence of direct, indirect, locative, transitive, intransitive and other objects and also results in various changes that affect the abovementioned elements.

Conjugation usage
For transitive conjugations, the accusative, dative, comitative or instrumental case must be present – identified by -a/, -u/-y, -e or -i, respectively.

Intransitive conjugations with all cases except the four transitive (mentioned above) cases and as well as the partitive. This form of conjugation is identifiable by the presence of –ok/-өk in the verb.

Indefinite conjugations are used when there is a partitive object or none at all.

Comments
privacy | FAQs | rules | statistics | graphs | donate | api (indev)
Viewing CWS in: English | Time now is 01-Feb-23 21:35 | Δt: 358.0241ms