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Qgam Traditional Script
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This public article was written by clawgrip, and last updated on 16 Sep 2018, 00:02.

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Menu 1. Overview 2. Initial Consonants 3. Vowels 4. Final Consonants 5. Irregular ligatures 6. Orthographic Conventions 7. Sentences 8. Influence on other writing systems 9. Styles Note that the script will only appear vertical in Firefox. If you're using Internet Explorer, ligatures won't work and why are you using Internet Explorer?

[top]Overview

The Qgam traditional script (Qgam daĝ ho taaĝ) is a vertically-written, phonetic script used to write  Qgam Dzwo, and is one of the two scripts to hold official status in Qgam, the other being Qgamic Qonklese characters, the adoption of which has led to a significant decrease of the former, which is used only as a minority script in certain remote areas, and as a decorative script throughout the country. Despite its relative disuse among Qgams, the traditional script remains an official script by mandate of the government, which promotes it as a symbol of national unity.

The use of the traditional script predates or is at least contemporary with the earliest use of Qonklese characters. The scripts were not frequently mixed, that is to say using both scripts within a single sentence or text, though some historical examples of mixed-script texts do exist.

The Qgam traditional script evolved from the old version of a script that retroactively was never used to write a language that retroactively never existed; thus, its ultimate origin is unknown. It is slated to be closely related to the contemporary Herdekian script.

The script is divided into three types of letters: initial consonants, vowels, and final consonants, each of which displaying characteristic orthographic properties.

[top]Initial Consonants

Following is a table of all initial consonant letters:
p
/p/
b
/b/
m
/m/
t
/t/
d
/d/
n
/n/
s
/s/
dz
/d͡z/
k
/k/
kh
/k͡x/
g
/g/
ĝ
/ŋ/
q
/ʔ/
š
/ɕ/
w
/w/
r
/ɻ/
l
/l/
ļ
/ʎ/
 
h
/x/
c
/t͡ɕ/
j
/d͡ʑ/
ç
/ç/
y
/j/

Initial consonant letters typically always connect to initial consonant letters appearing directly before them. Exceptions include the letter , which only connects upwards on the right side, the letters and , which do not connect upwards, and the letter , which does not connect to any letters.

Most letters connect downward only on the side which carries a descender, e.g. , , and connect downward on the left only, while , , and connect downward on the right only.

The letters , , and may connect on both the left and the right, while the letter is unique in that it connects in the middle.

Examples:


+

dr
+

kj
+

qg


The letters and are slightly altered in form when connecting upwards:


+

pw
+

sw
+

py
+

sy


[top]Vowels

Following is a table of the seven vowel letters:
aa
/ɑ:/
e
/ɛ/
a
/ʌ/
i
/i/
o
/ɔ/
wo
/wɔə/
ea
/eə/

All vowel letters consistently connect to the preceding consonant letter. As the majority of consonant letters may only connect on either the left or right, vowel signs will frequently be mirrored in order to connect properly. The table above represents the vowel letters' orientations when not governed by the preceding consonant.

Examples:

taa

šaa

caa

me

de

ce

ba

la

ca

ni

ļi

ci

dzo

kho

co

hwo

kwo

cuo

rea

yea

cea


[top]Final Consonants

The script employs distinct cononant letters to represent syllable-final consonants. The full inventory is as follows:
-m
/m/

/ŋ/
-w
/w/
-r
/ɻ/
-y
/j/

The final consonant letters are all abbreviated forms of the initial consonant letters. However, these letters do not connect to letters before or after them.

Examples:





rim
scuoĝ
pyew
hnqear
bwoy
"away"
"boy"
"coffin"
"wayward"
"future"


[top]Irregular ligatures

At the moment, there are none, though I am considering adding a few.

[top]Orthographic Conventions

The spelling of the traditional script reflects the pronunciation of the language quite accurately. The words am and ar, when abbreviated as 'm and 'r, are written using final consonant letters.





šmuoy am
mlo 'm
keam ar
gmtaa 'r
"a lake (ACC)"
"water (ACC)"
"the mountain"
"the spider"


[top]Sentences

The traditional Qgam script employs no punctuation. Words are not separated by spaces; spaces instead carry the functions of both commas and full stops. Traditionally, the writing direction was top to bottom, left to right, but due to influence from Qonklese writing, a right-to-left direction also became common.


 
 

Im do aa 'm pedzaa dyuo khaam, aa ma meaĝ tim ta 'm hanwea. Wa di im yam pedzaa?
I can't do it without your help. So, will you help me?


[top]Influence on other writing systems

Two letters from the traditional script were, after having undergone significant alteration, adopted into the Qgamic version of Qonklese characters; both characters represent grammatical functions of the Qgam language, and are unknown outside of Qgam:

definite article
-r
ar; 'r
plural auxiliary verb marker
i
no specific pronunciation


[top]Styles

The traditional script is written in various styles. Here are two further examples:

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