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From Eluunie to Eklia
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This public article was written by Elunia, and last updated on 23 Dec 2018, 06:37.

[comments] Menu 1. Phonology 2. Basic sentence structure 3. Grammar 4. Nouns 5. Verbs
?FYI...
This article is a work in progress! Check back later in case any changes have occurred.

In the process of development  Eluunie has become a lexical mess. So I decided to switch to  Eklia and eventually kill Eluunie. Here is the list of differences between old  Eluunie and new  Eklia.

[top]Phonology

Here  Eluunie and  Eklia can be called absolutely different languages with only few items in common.
 Eluunie uses 5 basic and 5 iotified vowels and 4 consonants that can go only as coda. In  Eklia there are 14(!) vowels plus 6 iotified variants of /a/,/ɛ/,/i/,/o/, /u/ and /ɨ/ having 4 modifications: modal, nasal, breathy and sibilated.
The only common thing is the main idea: the consonantless language (though Eluunie has acquired 4 consonants while Eklia still doesn't distinguish the consonants in the vowels' modifications on the official level).

[top]Basic sentence structure

 Eluunie has SOV sentence structure with the template of:
Subject_article Subject_noun AS adjectives UN possessor EIS number Object_article Object_noun AS adjectives UN possessor EIS number I postposition Adverbs Verb Verb_tense Sign_word.

 Eklia instead has VSO sentence structure with possible change to VOS. The basic template is:
Main_verb Additional_verbs Subject_article Subject_noun SA adjectives NV possessor SJ number A Object_article Object_noun SA adjectives NV possessor SJ number I postpositions Adverbs Verb_tense Sign_word.

Compare the sentences: "I read my favourite book".
In  Eluunie: "Ä ë hono as aïna un ä i uhü es". Gloss: 1SFirst person singular (person)
speaker, signer, etc.; I
3SThird person singular (person)
neither speaker nor addressee
book ADJAdjectival
syntactic
favourite POSSGPossessed (case)
marks being owned
1SFirst person singular (person)
speaker, signer, etc.; I
OBLOblique (argument)
indirect or demoted object
read PRESPresent tense (tense)
current

In  Eklia: "Sëå ja a je sëså sa yso nv ja i se". Gloss: Read 1SFirst person singular (person)
speaker, signer, etc.; I
NOMNominative (case)
TRANS subject, INTR argument
3SThird person singular (person)
neither speaker nor addressee
book ADJAdjectival
syntactic
favourite POSSGPossessed (case)
marks being owned
1SFirst person singular (person)
speaker, signer, etc.; I
OBLOblique (argument)
indirect or demoted object
PRESPresent tense (tense)
current
;
or: "Sëå je sëså sa yso nv ja i ja a se", Gloss: Read 3SThird person singular (person)
neither speaker nor addressee
book ADJAdjectival
syntactic
favourite POSSGPossessed (case)
marks being owned
1SFirst person singular (person)
speaker, signer, etc.; I
OBLOblique (argument)
indirect or demoted object
1SFirst person singular (person)
speaker, signer, etc.; I
NOMNominative (case)
TRANS subject, INTR argument
PRESPresent tense (tense)
current
; if you want to point the object as the topic of the sentence.

[top]Grammar

Both languages are analytic in the basis with ability to agglutinate the words. Both distinguish the role of the word only among other words in the sentence.

[top]Nouns

Both  Eluunie and  Eklia use articles and postpositions to show that the words are the nouns. In both languages there are 2 main cases: Nominativ and Oblique. For oblique case both languages use the particle "i" after themselves and add postpositions after this particles.
In nominativ case  Eluunie doesn't have any indicators of the end of the subject, while  Eklia has the particle "a" to show the nominative case and "ha" to show the topic of the sentence if it is one of the words with the nominative case.

[top]Verbs

Verbs have 4 basic tenses: past, present, future in the past. In  Eklia there are additional tenses looking similar to English Continuous.
Tense Eluunie Eklia
Presentesse
Pastoye
Futureaho
Future in the pastahoyoe
Present Continuoussi
Past Continuousesi
Future Continuousosi


Negative sentences are formed via "an" for  Eluunie and "hu" for  Eklia prefix to the tense mark (at the end of the sentence).
More complex tenses are formed with the additional verbs.

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