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Edievian Numbers
This public article was written by argyle, and last updated on 6 Jul 2016, 17:15.

[comments] Menu 1. Cardinal Numbers 2. Ordinal Numbers 3. Fractions 4. Writing Numbers Edievian speakers, like everyone else, need to count. Here's how it's done.

[top]Cardinal Numbers

Cardinal numbers (dil aedilil, counting numbers) are the most basic. Edievian uses a base-10 system. See below for zero through ten:

NumberEdievian
0sero
1nao
2tií
3caen
4le
5náig
6emae
7sad
8adaet
9cab
10im

The multiples of ten are formed with the base number + im. A few numbers, in italics, have slightly contracted forms:

NumberEdievian
20tiím
30caenim
40leim
50nagiím
60emim
70sadim
80adaetim
90cavim

The teens and further numbers are composed with [multiple of ten] + [number].

NumberEdievian
11imnao
12imtií
23tiímcaen
35caenimnáig
88adaetimadaet

Higher numbers are as follows. They are formed in a similar pattern, with multiples going ahead of the main number, and additives following. Note that for numbers like 200 or 3,000, the base number must be put in the plural, eg, 100 igand; 200 tií igáind (though 200 is often shortened to tiígáind).

NumberEdievian
100igand
1,000tesots
10,000imtesúits
100,000igandtesúits
1,000,000melion
1,000,000,000belion

[top]Ordinal Numbers

Ordinal numbers (dil nevobil, sequential numbers) are formed with the suffixes aéis or ´is:

NumberEdievian
1stnaóis
2ndtiîis
3rdcaéins
4thléis
5thnagiáéis
6themaéis
7thsadaéis
8thadaetaéis
9thcabaéis
10thíims

When written in numerals, the digit is followed by 's, so 1st is written 1's, 2nd is 2's, etc. Handwritten ordinal numbers are written with the digit followed by <ś>; 1ś, 2ś, 3ś, etc. Higher numbers follow the same rule as above, a few examples:

NumberEdievian
11thimnaóis
12thimtiîis
23rdtiímcaéins
35thcaenimnagiáéis
88thadaetimadaetaéis


[top]Fractions

Fractions (nasedúirt, that which is portioned/sectioned) use a circumflex construction. The basic fractions (two through ten) have unique forms:

NumberEdievian
/2odiát
/3ogaent
/4oleat
/5onast
/6onemaet
/7osadat
/8ondaedat
/9ogavat
/10onent

Other numbers use the construction o(n)+[number]+at, literally meaning "that which is of [number]". Using this, other fractions would be:
NumberEdievian
n/23otiímcaenat
n/15onimnagiát
n/67onemimsadat
n/99ocavimcabat

A full fraction is then written as [numerator] + [denominator]. Note that if the numerator is more than one, the denominator is pluralized, like in English.

    1/5: nao onast

    4/17: le onimsadáit


For fractions of larger or more complex numbers, such as 56/12.362, it is more common to hear [numerator] + "aolor si" + [denominator], literally "numerator split by denominator":

    nagiímiaëmae aolor si imtiítesúits-caenigáind-emimtií


[top]Writing Numbers

Like the majority of Europe, Edievian writing conventions state that decimals are marked with a <,>, so 1 Euro and 50 Eurocent would be written as 1,50 €.

The <.> is used to divide thousands, e.g., one-thousand two-hundred and seven 1.207.

Edievia is not part of the EU, but is an EFTA member and does accept the Euro as currency. The Euro sign is placed after the number, e.g., 5 €, 1.000 €. The Edievian currency is Paels (plural péils), and is noted with , which also follows the written number.
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