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Lyladnese Alphabet
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This public article was written by [Deactivated User], and last updated on 6 Jan 2019, 21:17.

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Natively, Lyladnese mainly uses the Osveraali script, but also uses the Jáhka-Esaamic script and the Anewoa often enough that they are co-official.

Lyladnese's romanization is mainly inspired by the Baltic languages, Estonian, and Romanian. Excluding letters with diacritics and the digraph, it contains every Latin letter besides X.

The full alphabet without some letters with diacritics are below:
LetterIPA
aa
āɑ
ąɐ̃:
eɛ
ē
ęẽː
ii
oo
uu
ŏɔ
ãɔ̃ː
üy
öø
øø̃:
õɤ
ŭɯ
ëə
yj or ɪ
ȳʏ
bb
țts
c
ġ
dd
ff
vv
gg
hh
ķx
rʁ
kk
ll
mm
nn
ngŋ
pp
ss
zz
șʃ
jʒ
tt
θ
wɣʷ
qʔ


Diacritics:
Lyladnese uses a lot of different diacritics, as shown in the alphabet above, and each have a specific function.
  • Acutes are used very rarely in order to stress syllables that normally wouldn't be stressed.
  • Diaereses are used to front a back-rounded vowel.
  • Circumflexes are used to lengthen a vowel that had a diaeresis over it before.
  • Breves are used in two ways. On Ŏ, it is used to lower it. On Ŭ, it is used for unrounding.
  • Dots below are used to "harden" a consonant, which usually means where it normally would be palatalized, it isn't. On Ṭ and Ḍ it marks them being plosives where they'd normally be fricatives.
  • Dots above are only used with Ġ, which turns it to /dʒ/.
  • Macrons are usually used to lengthen a vowel, with the exception of Ā, which backs it. On Ē, it also raises the vowel.
  • Ogoneks are used to nasalize vowels.
  • Tildes are used to nasalize vowels vowels which had a diaeresis, or to nasalize Ŏ by writing Ã. It is used on Õ to unround O.
  • Bars are only used on Ø to front and nasalize O.
  • Commas are usually used below consonants to palatalize them. It is used on Ķ to turn it into a fricative. It is used on Ț to turn it to /ts/. It is used on Ḑ to represent /θ/. It is used on Ș to represent /ʃ/.
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