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Positioning and Series of Particles
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To keep track of if particles fall before or after their phrases, and how particles in series are compounded.
This public article was written by blindcat97, and last updated on 26 Jun 2017, 19:58.

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?FYI...
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Particles, which form some of the fundamental concepts of Oishio, follow strict rules about where they fall relative to the phrases they affect and/or describe. In the vast majority of cases, particles fall after the target phrases. In a few cases, the particles fall before. There are also rules for handling particles that fall in a series. It is worthwhile to note that small words resembling particles are used to conjugate certain roots, especially verbs; however, these are not particles, but instead part of the conjugations themselves. If a particle falls after this conjugation, it is not compounded.

Below, I've compiled a table listing the particles in Oishio (in no particular order), whether the particle falls before or after the target phrase, and the gloss(es) of each. This table will be regularly updated to reflect new entries, which are readily pouring in (as I determine what to handle with particles versus using affixes).

ie
After
NOM
iu
After
ACC
iuī
After
ACC*

After**
YN
ou
After
INDF
ua
After
DEF
ōnō
Replaces object
INTR
ū
Object ū Owner
GEN
ē
After
PR


* This version of the accusative is used when the particles both falls at the end of the sentence, and the sentence is a polar (yes/no) question. The separate polar question particle is then omitted.
** Falls the end of the entire sentence, all of which is considered to be the target phrase.

In addition, there are rules for managing particles in a series. Particles, for the most part, still follow the phonological restraints that require a vowel or diphthong at the beginning and end of the word. Thus, to separate them into distinct particles instead of a single, longer word, as well as to ease understanding (without having to decipher the component parts of an unruly mass of sounds), the glottal stop ʔ is used between each (although native speakers may not enunciate this fully, especially in a hurry). As an example, uarueā ua ū ē ērauī "the tree of Eraui" (where Eraui is a name) would compound the particles ua, ū, and ē, where they fall in succession. Thus, the final, correct phrase is uarueā ua'ū'ē ērauī.
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