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Lesson #3: Adjectives
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Words describing nouns.
This public article was written by Megafield2, and last updated on 14 Feb 2017, 05:55.

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Adjectives in Queith

In general, adjectives in Queith are used like they are English. These words are used to describe nouns and usually appear in front of the noun that they describe. Unlike English, however; there are several different types of declensions for adjectives. Depending on what type of noun the adjective is describing, a specific type of declension is used. For example, the same adjective that is used to describe an animal, can appear differently if it is being used to describe a human.

Adjective forms

There are nine forms of adjectives.

Basic Form is the most basic form of adjectives that can be used to describe almost any adjective.

Animal Form is the form used to describe nouns of a living animal. This includes mammals, reptiles, insects, and so on. However, this form is not used to describe the body part of an animal or a dead animal.

Animal Body Part Form is the form to describe nouns of a living animal's body part. This includes eyes, bones, wings, brains, and so on. This form is not used to describe the whole animal, the body part of an animal that is dead, or an animal product such as milk or eggs.

Human Form is the form to describe nouns of sentient beings. This includes humans, elves, fictional characters that are animals that act like humans (like Mickey Mouse or Bugs Bunny) that are still alive, or when speaking about a deceased person in general.

Human Body Part Form is the form to describe nouns of the physical body parts of sentient beings. This includes eyes, hair, lungs, skin, and so on. This form is not used to describe nonphysical parts of sentient beings such as the soul, spirit, or mind. This form is also used to describe the corpse of someone deceased. The human form is still used to describe someone deceased when speaking about them in memory.

Plant Form is the form to describe nouns of plants and plant matter, or organisms that are plantlike. This includes flowers, trees, leaves, stems, and seeds.

Tangible Form is the form used to describe nouns of physical material objects or things. This includes rocks, water, planets, computers, books, and so on. Anything that physically exists and isn't an animal, plant, or human is described using this form, including other forms of life like bacteria.

Intangible Form is the form used to describe nouns of nonmaterial things or ideas. This includes language, concepts, the human mind, colors, activities and so on. Anything that doesn't have a physical form.

Spiritual Form is the form used to describe nouns of spiritual things that typically don't have a physcial form. This includes a person's soul, angels, demons, ghosts, God, and so on. Anything that doesn't have a physical form and is spiritual in nature.

More on Declensions

Each adjective form follows the same basic model. There are dfferent forms of each declension depending on the style or mood of the speaker. Not all declensions are used in all adjective classes.

Basic Form is the most basic form of the declension that fits no specific mood.

Abstract Form may be used in very specific situations, such as describing something that has a physical form in the real world, but may being used in a situation where the speaker is talking about it appearing in a dream or some other situation that didn't occur in real life.

Assumptive may be used in situations where the speaker is making the assumption that the object has this quality.

Believed may be used when the speaker believes that this is a quality of a specific object.

Emphatic is used when the speaker wants emphasis on the noun being described and that the listener or reader should keep this quality in mind and that it is very important.

Poetic is used in a poetic or artistic mood.

Polite is used in a polite mood.

Profanitive makes the adjective into an insult or curse word.

Reputative is used when the object is generally thought to have this quality by the general public.

Affirmative is used to emphasize positive notions.

Prohibitive is used to emphasize negative notions.

Furthermore, each of these forms have declensions in comparative forms.

Class 1: Basic Adjective Form

Each adjective has a base form, which can be used in any situation and still be considered grammatically correct. This form is usually used in more informal conversation, younger speakers, or people that do not speak Queith fluently. There are a few words in Queith that do not have a Basic form, which are the only words where it would be grammatically incorrect to use this form.

Examples for the word suѱ (suð), which means smooth in English.

suѱ skén /suð skɛn/ smooth skin

suѱon skén /suðoʊn skɛn/ smoother skin

suѱono skén /suðoʊnoʊ skɛn/ (more than smoother, less than smoothest) skin (does not have an English equivalent)

suѱoño skén /suðoʊnjoʊ skɛn/ smoothest skin

suѱoñoa skén /suðoʊnjoʊeɪ skɛn/ (more than smoothest) skin (does not have an English equivalent)

To make any of these into the abstract form of these, simply add ábe /æbi/ in front of the adjective.

Example: ábesuѱ skén /æbisuð skɛn /

To make any of these into the assumptive form, add əzu /əzu/ in front.

Example: əzusuѱon skén /əzusuðoʊn skɛn/

To make any of these into the believed form, add xu /ʒu/ in front.

Example: xusuѱono skén /ʒusuðoʊnoʊ skɛn/

To make any of these into the stressed/emphasived form, add cei /t͡ʃiaɪ/ in front.

Example: ceisuѱoño skén /t͡ʃiaɪsuðoʊnjoʊ skɛn/

To make any of these into the poetic form, add ñalyə /njeɪljə/ in front.

Example: ñalyəsuѱoñoa skén /njeɪljəsuðoʊnjoʊeɪ skɛn/

To make any of these into the polite form, add péteto /pɛtitoʊ/ in front.

Example: pétetosuѱ skén /pɛtitoʊsuð skɛn/

To make any of these into profanity, insult, or curse word, add bífú /bɪfʌ/ in front.

Example: bífúsuѱ skén /bɪfʌsuð skɛn/

To make any of these into the reputative form, add əripe /əɹaɪpis/ in front.

Example: əripesuѱ skén /əɹaɪpisuð skɛn/

Class 2: Animal Form

This is used when an adjective is describing an animal.

Examples for the word, prajenqoԅéc /pɹeɪd͡ʒinkwoʊʃɛt͡ʃ /, which means dangerous in English.

prajenqoԅéc riox /pɹeɪd͡ʒinkwoʊʃɛt͡ʃ ɹaɪoʊʒ/ dangerous lion

prajenqoԅécela riox /pɹeɪd͡ʒinkwoʊʃɛt͡ʃileɪ ɹaɪoʊʒ/ more dangerous lion

prajenqoԅécelás riox /pɹeɪd͡ʒinkwoʊʃɛt͡ʃilæs ɹaɪoʊʒ/ between more & most dangerous lion (no English equivalent)

prajenqoԅéceləbwə riox /pɹeɪd͡ʒinkwoʊʃɛt͡ʃiləbwə ɹaɪoʊʒ/ most lion

prajenqoԅéceləbwás riox /pɹeɪd͡ʒinkwoʊʃɛt͡ʃiləbwæs ɹaɪoʊʒ/ more than most dangerous (no English equivalent)

Add əbwə /əbwə/ in front for the abstract form.

Example: əbwəprajenqoԅéc /əbwəpɹeɪd͡ʒinkwoʊʃɛt͡ʃ/

Add áze /æzi/ in front for the assumptive form.

Example: ázeprajenqoԅéc /æzipɹeɪd͡ʒinkwoʊʃɛt͡ʃ/

Add bélya /bɛljeɪ/ in front for the believed form.

Example: bélyaprajenqoԅéc /bɛljeɪpɹeɪd͡ʒinkwoʊʃɛt͡ʃ/

Add ámule /æmuli/ in front for the emphasized form.

Example: ámuleprajenqoԅéc /æmulipɹeɪd͡ʒinkwoʊʃɛt͡ʃ/

Add velyo /viljoʊ/ in front for the poetic form.

Example: velyoprajenqoԅéc /viljoʊpɹeɪd͡ʒinkwoʊʃɛt͡ʃ/

Add épeto /ɛpitoʊ/ in front for the polite form.

Example: épetoprajenqoԅéc /ɛpitoʊpɹeɪd͡ʒinkwoʊʃɛt͡ʃ/

Add bífú /bɪfʌ/ in front for the profane form.

Example: bífúprajenqoԅéc /bɪfʌpɹeɪd͡ʒinkwoʊʃɛt͡ʃ/

Add orágo /oʊɹægoʊ/ in front for the reputative form.

Example: orágoprajenqoԅéc /oʊɹægoʊpɹeɪd͡ʒinkwoʊʃɛt͡ʃ/

Class 3: Animal Body Parts

This form is used when describing the physical body parts of animals.

Examples for the word, eyét/ijɛt/, which means wet in English.

eyét sər /ijɛt səɹ/ wet fur

eyétela sər /ijɛtileɪ səɹ/ wetter fur

eyételás sər /ijɛtilæs səɹ/ between wetter & wettest fur (No direction English equivalent)

eyételəbwə sər /ijɛtiləbwə səɹ/ wettest fur

eyételəbwás sər /ijɛtiləbwæs səɹ/ more wettest fur (No direction English equivalent)

Any of these may be formed into the abstract form by adding əbwu /əbwu/ in front.

Example: əbwueyét sər /əbwuijɛt səɹ/

Any of these may be formed into the assumptive form by adding ázue /æzui/ in front.

Example: ázueeyét sər /æzuiijɛt səɹ/

Any of these may formed into the believed form by adding bélyu /bɛlju/ in front.

Example: bélyueyét sər /bɛljuijɛt səɹ/

Any of these may be formed into the emphatic or stressed form by adding ámulu /æmulu/ in front.

Example: ámulueyét sər /æmuluijɛt səɹ/

Any of these may be formed into the poetic form by adding veluyo /vilujoʊ/ in front.

Example: veluyoeyét sər /vilujoʊijɛt səɹ/

Any of these may be formed into the polite form by adding épeto /ɛpitoʊ/ in front.

Example: épetoeyét sər /ɛpitoʊijɛt səɹ/

Any of these may be formed into the profane form by adding bífú /bɪfʌ/ in front.

Example: bífúeyét sər /bɪfʌijɛt səɹ/

Any of these may be formed into the reputative form by adding orágu /oʊɹægu/ in front.

Example: orágueyét sər /oʊɹæguijɛt səɹ/

Class 4: Human Form

This adjective form is used when describing human beings, sentient beings (that aren't spiritual in nature), and fictional characters.

Examples for the word, fyímé /fjɪmɛ/, which means pretty in English.

fyímé həúnfé /fjɪmɛ həʌnfɛ/ pretty woman

fyíméabó həúnfé /fjɪmɛeɪbɑ həʌnfɛ/ prettier woman

fyíméabón həúnfé /fjɪmɛeɪbɑn həʌnfɛ/ (more than prettier, less than prettiest) woman (no direct English equivalent.

fyíméabóno həúnfé /fjɪmɛeɪbɑnoʊ həʌnfɛ/ prettiest woman

fyíméabóño həúnfé /fjɪmɛeɪbɑnjoʊ həʌnfɛ/ more prettiest woman (no direct English equivalent.

Add bóñə /bɑnjə/ in front to form the abstract form.

Example: bóñəfyímé /bɑnjəfjɪmɛ/

Add xóz /ʒɑz/ in front to form the assumptive form.

Example: xózfyímé /ʒɑzfjɪmɛ/

Add béln /bɛln/ in front to form the believed form.

Exampe: bélnfyímé /bɛlnfjɪmɛ/

Add əmf /əmf/ in front to form the emphatic form.

Example: əmffyímé /əmffjɪmɛ/

Add pélyo /pɛljoʊ/ in front to form the poetic form.

Example: pélyo /pɛljoʊ/

Add péteto /pɛtitoʊ/ in front to form the polite form.

Example: péteto /pɛtitoʊ/

Add bífú /bɪfʌ/ in front to form the profane form.

Example: bífúfyímé /bɪfʌfjɪmɛ/

Add əmayú /əmeɪjʌ/ in front to form the reputative form.

Example: əmayúfyímé /əmeɪjʌfjɪmɛ/

Class 5: Human Body Parts Form

These are the forms of adjectives when they describe body parts and organs of humans.

Examples for the word réxé /ɹɛʒɛ/, which is the color red in English.

réxé ѱés /ɹɛʒɛ ðɛs/ red hair

réxéabó ѱés /ɹɛʒɛeɪbɑ ðɛs/ redder hair

réxéabón ѱés /ɹɛʒɛeɪbɑn ðɛs/ (between redder and reddest) hair (no direct English equivalent)

réxéabóno ѱés /ɹɛʒɛeɪbɑnoʊ ðɛs/ reddest hair

réxéabóño ѱés /ɹɛʒɛeɪbɑnjoʊ ðɛs/ (more than reddest) hair (no direct English equivalent)

Add bóñá /bɑnjæ/ in front to form the abstract form.

Example: bóñáréxé /bɑnjæɹɛʒɛ/

Add xáz /ʒæz/ in front to form the assumptive form.

Example: xázréxéabón /ʒæzɹɛʒɛeɪbɑn/

Add bélná /bɛlnæ/ in front to form the believed form.

Example: bélnáréxéabóno /bɛlnæɹɛʒɛeɪbɑnoʊ/

Add əmfəm /əmfəm/ in front to form the emphatic form.

Example: əmfəmréxéabó /əmfəmɹɛʒɛeɪbɑ/

Add péláyo /pɛlæjoʊ/ in front to form the poetic form.

Example: péláyoréxé /pɛlæjoʊɹɛʒɛ/

Add péteto /pɛtitoʊ/ in front to form the polite form.

Example: pétetoréxéabóño /pɛtitoʊɹɛʒɛeɪbɑnjoʊ/

Add bífú /bɪfʌ/ in front to form the profane form.

Example: bífúréxéabóno /bɪfʌɹɛʒɛeɪbɑnoʊ/

Add əmáyú /əmæjʌ/ in front to form the reputative form.

Example: əmáyúréxé /əmæjʌɹɛʒɛ/

Class 6: Tangible Objects Form

This adjective form is used when describing physical objects.

Examples for the word yoje /joʊd͡ʒi/, which means small in English.

yoje worcjov /joʊd͡ʒi woʊɹt͡ʃd͡ʒoʊv/ small sword

yojeon worcjov /joʊd͡ʒioʊn woʊɹt͡ʃd͡ʒoʊv/ smaller sword

yojeono worcjov /joʊd͡ʒioʊnoʊ woʊɹt͡ʃd͡ʒoʊv/ (between smaller and smallest) sword (no direct English equivalent)

yojeoño worcjov /joʊd͡ʒioʊnjoʊ woʊɹt͡ʃd͡ʒoʊv/ smallest sword

yojeoñoa worcjov /joʊd͡ʒioʊnjoʊeɪ woʊɹt͡ʃd͡ʒoʊv/ (more than smallest) sword (no direct English equivalent)

Add áce /æt͡ʃi/ in front to form the abstract form.

Examples: áceyoje /æt͡ʃijoʊd͡ʒi/

Add əxa /əʒeɪ/ in front to form the assumptive form.

Example: əxayojeon /əʒeɪjoʊd͡ʒioʊn/

Add xu /ʒu/ in front to form the believed form.

Example: xuyojeoño /ʒujoʊd͡ʒioʊnjoʊ/

Add alya /eɪljeɪ/ in front to form the poetic form.

Example: alyayojeoñoa /eɪljeɪjoʊd͡ʒioʊnjoʊeɪ/

Add ariptu /eɪɹaɪptu/ in front to form the reputative form.

Example: ariptuyoje /eɪɹaɪptujoʊd͡ʒi/

Class 7: Plants Form

This adjective form is used when describing plant matter.

Examples for the word vwƣzsévt /vwɔizsɛvt/, which means poisonous in English.

vwƣzsévt xҧlər /vwɔizsɛvt ʒaʊləɹ/ poisonous flower

vwƣzsévton xҧlər /vwɔizsɛvtoʊn ʒaʊləɹ/ more poisonous flower

vwƣzsévtono xҧlər /vwɔizsɛvtoʊnoʊ ʒaʊləɹ/ (between more and most) poisonous flower (no direct English equivalent)

vwƣzsévtoño xҧlər /vwɔizsɛvtoʊnjoʊ ʒaʊləɹ/ most poisonous flower

vwƣzsévtoñoa xҧlər /vwɔizsɛvtoʊnjoʊeɪ ʒaʊləɹ/ (more than most) poisonous flower (no direct English equivalent)

Add ápe /æpi/ in front to form the abstract form.

Example: ápevwƣzsévt /æpivwɔizsɛvt/

Add əxu /əʒu/ in front to form the assumptive form.

Example: əxuvwƣzsévtono /əʒuvwɔizsɛvtoʊnoʊ/

Add xu /ʒu/ in front to form the believed form.

Example: xuvwƣzsévt /ʒuvwɔizsɛvt/

Add palya /peɪljeɪ/ in front to form the poetic form.

Example: palyavwƣzsévtoñoa /peɪljeɪvwɔizsɛvtoʊnjoʊeɪ/

Add aripe /eɪɹaɪpi/ in front to form the reputative form.

Example: aripevwƣzsévtoño /eɪɹaɪpivwɔizsɛvtoʊnjoʊ/

Class 8 Intangible Things

This adjective form is used when describing ideas, concepts, and other nonphysical things.

Examples for the word foje /foʊd͡ʒi/, which means common in English.

foje jáqҧərx /foʊd͡ʒi d͡ʒækwaʊəɹʒ/ common knowledge

fojeon jáqҧərx /foʊd͡ʒioʊn d͡ʒækwaʊəɹʒ/ more common knowledge

fojeono jáqҧərx /foʊd͡ʒioʊnoʊ d͡ʒækwaʊəɹʒ/ (between more and most) common knowledge (no direct English equivalent)

fojeoño jáqҧərx /foʊd͡ʒioʊnjoʊ d͡ʒækwaʊəɹʒ/ most common knowledge

fojeoñoa jáqҧərx /foʊd͡ʒioʊnjoʊeɪ d͡ʒækwaʊəɹʒ/ (more than most) common knowledge (no direct English equivalent)

Add ácne /æt͡ʃni/ in front to form the abstract form.

Example: ácnefoje /æt͡ʃnifoʊd͡ʒi/

Add aca /eɪt͡ʃeɪ/ in front to form the assumptive form.

Example: acafojeoñoa /eɪt͡ʃeɪfoʊd͡ʒioʊnjoʊeɪ/

Add cu /t͡ʃu/ in front to form the believed form.

Example: cufojeon /t͡ʃufoʊd͡ʒioʊn/

Add calya /t͡ʃeɪljeɪ/ in front to form the poetic form.

Example: calyafojeono /t͡ʃeɪljeɪfoʊd͡ʒioʊnoʊ/

Add cariptu /t͡ʃeɪɹaɪptu/

Example: cariptufojeoño /t͡ʃeɪɹaɪptufoʊd͡ʒioʊnjoʊ/

Class 9: Spiritual Form

This adjective form is used when describing anything spiritual in nature. Unlike the other classes, the Spiritual form always requires bévu /bɛvu/ to be put in front of the adjective to be grammatically correct.

Examples for the word squrəc /skwuɹət͡ʃ/, which means scary in English.

bévusqurəc nrosc /bɛvuskwuɹət͡ʃ nɹoʊst͡ʃ/ scary ghost

bévusqurəcés nrosc /bɛvuskwuɹət͡ʃɛs nɹoʊst͡ʃ/ scarier ghost

bévusqurəcése nrosc /bɛvuskwuɹət͡ʃɛsi nɹoʊst͡ʃ/ (between scarier and scariest) ghost

bévusqurəcéze nrosc /bɛvuskwuɹət͡ʃɛzi nɹoʊst͡ʃ/ scariest ghost

bévusqurəcézemé nrosc /bɛvuskwuɹət͡ʃɛzimɛ nɹoʊst͡ʃ/ (more than scariest) ghost

In the abstract form, bévumb /bɛvumb/ is placed in front of the adjective.

Example: bévumbsqurəc /bɛvumbskwuɹət͡ʃ/

In the assumptive form, bévuxémé /bɛvuʒɛmɛ/ is placed in the front.

Example: bévuxémésqurəcés /bɛvuʒɛmɛskwuɹət͡ʃɛs/

In the believed form, bévuhe /bɛvuhi/ is placed in the front.

Example: bévuhesqurəcézemé /bɛvuhiskwuɹət͡ʃɛzimɛ/

In the emphatic form, bévuexem /bɛvuiʒim/ is placed in the front.

Example: bévuexemsqurəcése /bɛvuiʒimskwuɹət͡ʃɛsi/

In the poetic form, bévulya /bɛvuljeɪ/ is placed in the front.

Example: bévulyasqurəcés /bɛvuljeɪskwuɹət͡ʃɛs/

In the polite form, bévueto /bɛvuitoʊ/ is placed in front.

Example: bévuetosqurəc /bɛvuitoʊskwuɹət͡ʃ/

In the affirmative form, bévuqo /bɛvukwoʊ/ is placed in front.

Example: bévuqosqurəcéze /bɛvukwoʊskwuɹət͡ʃɛzi/

In the prohibitive form, bévuqi /bɛvukwaɪ/ is placed in front.

Example: bévuqisqurəcézemé /bɛvukwaɪskwuɹət͡ʃɛzimɛ/
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