cws
Greetings Guest
Like shiny awards?
Did you know, you can get an award on CWS by making a donation?
[donate]
home > library > journal > view_article
« Back to Articles » Journal
Derivational Suffixes
0▲ 0 ▼ 0
Reference of derivational suffixes in Nithalos
This public article was written by hashi, and last updated on 9 Feb 2015, 22:18.

[comments] Menu
1. Agentiser (verb to noun): -am
2. Personifier: -kit
3. Location: -pada
4. Room: -sen
5. -Ologies: -do(una)

?FYI...
This article is a work in progress! Check back later in case any changes have occurred.
This is a reference of derivational suffixes in Nithalos. These are suffixes that commonly turn nouns into other nouns with related meanings, or turn verbs/adjectives into nouns also.

[top]Agentiser (verb to noun): -am


The suffix -am is a loosely used suffix that can mean:
  • the item used to do the action; or
  • a person who does the action


These suffixes are highly irregular in the way they are attached to the verb, and their final meaning. In some cases, the -am is attached directly to the end of the infinitive verb:
havi
dry, to
>haviam
drier (machine)
šopi
protect, to
šopiam
guardian/protector (person)
đai
love, to
đaiam
lover (person)
tansi
visit, to
tansiam
visitor (person)

-am can also be attached directly to the end of the verb after making the verb passive by changing the final -i to -a. These forms are completely arbitrarily formed as this derivation does not greatly differ in purpose or final meaning to those above, or those below. Note that the final -a from the verb, and the inital -a in the -am suffix do not merge. The resulting noun ends in -aam which is pronounced /ajam/. Some examples:
atahi
attach, to
>atahaam
attacker
mori
receive, to
moraam
recipient
arvi
give, to
arvaam
servant (not 'slave')
musni
steal, to
musnaam
thief


Aside from the two above, -am can also be added to the stem of a verb (the infinitive without the -i ending), an irregular stem of the verb (for example, the word 'worker' below), or it can also be attached to the end of noun to change the meaning of the noun.
rapti
work, to
>rapiam
worker
pedag
farm [n]
pedagam
farmer
samsei
war [n]
samseiam
soldier
pahaki
explode, to
pahakam
explosive (bomb etc.)


[top]Personifier: -kit


I don't really know what to call this suffix, however this one comes from the Nithalos word for person: kit and is often attached to words (as either kit or ki) to give an occupation, or show a particular group or type of people. Often the original word is distorted. Some examples below.

tura
temple
>takit
priest
koni
country
konkit
citizen
tino
small [adj]
tinkit
dwarf
marev
ocean, sea
marevki
pirate


[top]Location: -pada


The suffix -pada ('pada' by itself means 'port') is used to show a place where something happens. This could be a specific location, or building.

For example:
šoya
sky [n]
+ pada = šoyapada
airport [n]
nerti
sleep, to [v]
nerpada
bed [n]
tomni
capture, to [v]
tompada
prison [n]


[top]Room: -sen


The suffix -(e)sen means specifically a room where something happens. This comes from the word for room: kesen. Often an <e> is inserted between the end of the root word and the suffix to act as a buffer vowel. Sometimes this includes the morphing of the final vowel into <e>.

opri
teach, to [v]
+ sen = oprisen
classroom [n]
kuram
car, vehicle [n]
kurasen
garage [n]
nerti
sleep, to [v]
nertesen
bedroom [n]


[top]-Ologies: -do(una)


The suffix -do is used to show a the way or method that something happens, or to show an action. These are often used for fields of study. The -douna suffix is used when specifically referring to the study of that thing. For example:

adev
life [n]
+ do = adevdo
biology [n] (general)
+ douna = adevdouna
biology [n] (the academic study of)
karda
body [n]
+ do = kardodo
exercise [n] (physical)
+ douna = kardadouna
physiology [n] (the academic study of)


Comments (0)
privacy | FAQs | rules | statistics | graphs | donate | api (indev)
Viewing CWS in: English | Time now is 17-Oct-17 01:44